Your browser must support JavaScript

Lightning Animations (492 videos)

World_24HR_Apr_2015

--The equatorial trough, also called the Intertropical Convergence Zone, is intermittently defined near the equator over the eastern Pacific Ocean, and sometimes in the Atlantic, during most of the month. --Numerous large organized thunderstorm lines and complexes form in the western U.S. and Mexico and move east across the continent every few days. No rotation is apparent in these lines. --The major islands of SE Asia have thunderstorms most afternoons due to sea breezes and along the slopes of mountain ranges. --The Andes provide a sharp western boundary in a generally NNW-SSE line; no lightning occurs over the cold water offshore of the Andes. --Lightning is on the S side of the Himalayas over India on many days of the month. --No lightning occurs over the Sahara during the month, except along the immediate Mediterranean coast. --Daily storms over New Guinea are especially intense earlier in the month. ~Ron Holle

May 5, 2015 Webmaster Archive

Views 16
0 0

one comment, leave yours

--07 to 12 April: A relatively stationary SW-NE line of lightning extends across Saudi Arabia, and also appears in a weaker form later in the month. --09 April: Farthest N lightning of the month occurs along the coast of Norway. --09 to 11 April: A SW to NE swath of lightning spreads from Texas to Canada. --12 to 14 April: A well-organized area of lightning moves E to W from the Democratic Republic of the Congo into the Atlantic. --12 to 15 April: A large cyclonic circulation covers most of India. --13 to 16 April: A large cyclonic storm is evident in lightning over the South Atlantic between South America and Africa. -23 to 28 April: Afternoon thunderstorms form over the higher mountains of the western U.S. under a cold low aloft. --28 to 29 April: A cluster of frequent lightning races WNW to ESE across northern India at the base of the Himalayas. --29 to 20 April: A long stationary line of thunderstorms extends from west of Florida eastward into the central Atlantic Ocean. ~Ron Holle

May 6, 2015 1:33:04 AM Dave Fincher